Eve

Áine Minogue

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In a stirring departure from her past recordings, acclaimed Celtic harpist, vocalist, composer and arranger Áine Minogue will surprise – and soothe – listeners across the world with her new album entitled “Eve.”

Featuring a signature “fragile, lilting voice” throughout, Minogue’s fifteenth solo album contains 12 tracks that highlight her mesmerizing vocals, elegantly accompanied by her graceful play of the harp and skillful talents of renowned musicians Eugene Friesen on cello and strings; Jon Evans on bass, keyboards, percussion, guitar and mandolin; Seamus Egan on Irish whistles; Billy Novick on clarinet; and Alistair Halliday on harmony vocals.

A first for Minogue, the album is a compelling compilation of all original music written and composed by the award-winning singer and songwriter. It offers a captivating collection of emotive and expressive songs including “Love’s Sweet Refrain,” “Warrior or Healer,” “Song of the Lark,” “Before the World Was Made” and “The Garden.”

According to Minogue, inspiration for her new album, with its striking vocal, rather than instrumental, prominence, has its origins in what she describes as the “many definitions and varied manifestations of Eve” ranging from an “archetypical version as the mother of humanity or ‘Biblical Eve,’” as Minogue notes, to “a theatrical ‘Hollywood Eve’ version as portrayed by the collage of feminine images in the 1950 Academy Award-winning movie ‘All About Eve.’”

Minogue says that the album’s opening track, which shares the same title as the movie, was written during a viewing of the “exceptional and influential” film and that its lyrics, like those of the other 11 songs, “convey my own experience or relationship with Eve; who she is or what she is, who she may be or what she may be.”

She adds, however, that “the lyrics also enable or encourage, or perhaps empower, listeners, both women and men, to think about or appreciate their own views or beliefs about Eve, as well; who she was or what she was, who she can be or what she can be.”

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  1. 1 Oh Eve 04:24 Info
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  2. 2 Bad Pennies 02:30 Lyrics
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  3. 3 Ghostly Love 04:07 Info
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  4. 4 All About Eve 03:24 Info
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  5. 5 The Perfect Eve 03:13 Lyrics
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  6. 6 Georgie 04:29 Info
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  7. 7 Echo of Love 02:23 Info
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  8. 8 The Garden 05:38 Lyrics
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  9. 9 Love's Sweet Refrain 02:44 Info
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  10. 10 Puppetmaster 04:32 Lyrics
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  11. 11 Before the World Was Made 04:06 Info
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  12. 12 Warrior or Healer 03:27 Info
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Here's what Áine has to say about each of the tracks.

And you can view the videos and lyric videos for all the tracks here also.

The Perfect Eve 

It’s not about male or female but the feminine in all of us. I suppose it's Jungian although that wasn’t on my mind at the time of writing this song. It does reflect carrying shame for the other, shadows falling “on honeymoons” in the cave from which we can’t seem to escape. 

We think we’re getting close to the center through intimacy but it only seems to be drawing us further away from life outside the cave.  (yes - Plato) 

I was often surprised by the songs that poured out that were full of Eve imagery. She was buried so deeply in me I never even knew she was there. 

A long search about the mother of mankind yielded no art of a mother, only that of a woman exiled. 

There’s something extraordinary about this story, especially for those of us who love mythology and folklore, the idea that the mother of creation is never depicted as a mother in the creative world… How can this be when one of her sons was murdered by the other (Cain and Abel). 

How deeply does an archetype have to be embedded to yield only one creative expression (expulsion from the garden), when her story was so much bigger than that. 

Have you ever been a “Perfect Eve”?  

or  

What or who would your Perfect Eve look like?

On the musical side of things, it was wonderful to have Seamús Egan play so beautifully on this song. Just magical! 

Jaimee Joroff was the videographer of a beautiful depiction of the feminine subconscious in a video that you keep telling us you love! 

"The body is a sacrament . . . a visible sign of invisible grace. . . . All our inner life and intimacy of soul longs to find an outer mirror. It longs for a form in which it can be seen, felt, and touched. The body is the mirror where the secret world of the soul comes to expression. . . . The body is the temple of the Holy Spirit." John O Donohue 

Oh Eve 

 It seems we’ve been talking to and at Eve for a very long time.  

She’s connected to archetypes, “anecdotes and tales,”  and personified as having a powerful craven trance-enducing ability. She represents all that should be avoided.  

Eve is, for me, a tragic figure.  

Most women I know (myself included) would wish to be remembered above all as good mothers.  

Eve’s children killed each other. Cain killed Abel. Even the Greeks couldn’t match this for tragedy. Her role as “mother of mankind,” of a tragic woman who lost both her children, is reduced to seductress, temptress and enabler of evil.  

Her image changes over time somewhat and seems to mean different things to different people. She is the very definition of an Archetype.  

Her story continues…

Bad Pennies 

I often think of the feminine aspect - in both men and women - as hidden and mysterious. This song is about those parts that feel unretrievable, inaccessible or just plain buried. 

There’s a sense of isolation and isolating and of course, shame… 

There’s a requiem in all of us dancing through the motions. 

“And we’ll sing you a psalm 

Requiem for a hidden past” 

Will Eve ever stop hoping for a better past? 

Jon (Evans) did such beautiful work on this song and brought it to full form.

Ghostly Love 

The Ghostly Lover is a Jungian archetype and in this song he’s represented as the longings and imaginings of a woman who is, like her mother and grandmother before her, seeking and creating a man who is unattainable… 

This archetype applies to both men and women and the failure to grow up to the reality of our relationships, or face disappearing within them. 

“we’ll all melt in sunlight 

Disappear before we can go” 

All the imagery is Jungian, castles, stairs, drawbridges, doors and they all represent their classic Jungian meanings. 

I’m deeply grateful to dear friend Ellen Wingard for introducing the concept to me one afternoon during a phone chat, after which this song was promptly written! Thank you dear Ellen! 

And thanks to Al Halliday for his “haunting” vocal harmonies and the soul that shines through them.